The Graveyard Book – Review

Flashback Friday

Perpetually Past Due

The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman

Illustrations by Dave McKean

Published in 2008

Pages: 312

Genre: Fantasy, horror, children’s literature

“There was a hand in the darkness, and it held a knife.”

A man stalks up the stairs of an English house, searching for his final victim. Blood drips from the knife in his hand as he nears the finish of his dark deed. Victory, however, is not to be his. So begins The Graveyard Book, the tale of a baby toddling into a graveyard and being taken in by those who walk (0r float) in the twilight. Setting the tone for the book, the opening details a killer known as the man Jack who looks for the remaining child of a family of four who were fated to fall to his blade; or so he thought.

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Music Monday: “Dreams” by Fleetwood Mac

musicmonday

Music Monday is a meme, created by Drew at The Tattooed Book Geek, where I focus on a song I absolutely love and feel needs to be shared.

Song: “Dreams”
Artist: Fleetwood Mac
Album: Rumours (1977)

Continue reading “Music Monday: “Dreams” by Fleetwood Mac”

Cat’s Cradle – Review

Flashback Friday

Perpetually Past Due

Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut

Published in 1963

Pages: 270

Genre: Satire

“Call me Jonah.”

Cat’s Cradle is a story of satirical strangeness and absurd action. A man who calls himself by another name writes in retrospect regarding his research for a book about the end of the world and unwittingly finds himself present at the subject of his novel. Fraught with sarcasm and sardonic criticism of science, religion, technology, war, and many other topics, Cat’s Cradle showcases Kurt Vonnegut’s knack for the nearly nonsensical. (I need to lay off on the alliteration…yeesh)

The book begins with the narrator, John, describing his attempts to write a book about the day that the atom bomb was dropped over Hiroshima; he decides to research Dr. Felix Hoenikker, who was regarded as one of the fathers of the bomb. Through his research, Hoenikker’s strange personality and life story are revealed as John is thrust into…

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Snuff – Review

Flashback Friday

Perpetually Past Due

Snuff by Terry Pratchett

Published in 2011

Pages: 470

Genre: Fantasy, satire

“The goblin experience of the world is the cult or perhaps religion of Unggue.”

Commander Samuel Vimes is being pushed out of the very occupation he lives for by the one thing a career criminal catcher fears the most: vacation. In Snuff, this catalyst sends Vimes and his family off to their country estate so he can take a much needed holiday. Well, much needed in the opinion of everyone except Sam Vimes. However, it isn’t long into the trip that trouble rears its ugly head in the shape of a mysterious murder. True to his nature, Vimes jumps at the chance to bring justice to the ne’er-do-wells among the knolls.

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Three Year Anniversary!

Another year has passed with many changes, though almost all for the better. You have all been so supportive despite the fact my content and schedule have changed, and that is such a comfort; here is the current count since last year:

115 book reviews, 25 editorials, 79 Music Mondays, 43 movie reviews, and 16 personal posts with 1980 followers on WordPress, and 162 on Facebook.

Though I may seem like the cliche broken record, thank you again for all of your support. I couldn’t have a more amazing and humbling group of followers and friends, and that is entirely thanks to all of you reading this. As has become tradition, here is a picture of Hunter being adorable.

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He has a weird fascination with the texture of my guitar case.

Previously: Two Year Anniversary!

The image featured in this post can be found through the hyperlink below.
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