Soul Hunter – Review

Flashback Friday

Perpetually Past Due

Soul Hunter by Aaron Dembski-Bowden

Originally published in 2010, Limited Edition (pictured above) published in 2016

Pages: 377

Genre: Science fiction, military fiction

“It was a curse, to be a god’s son.”

In Soul Hunter, by Aaron Dembski-Bowden, Talos is a Space Marine in the 10th company of the traitorous Night Lords legion. He and his battle brothers search the galaxy, seeking vengeance and blood for the death of their primarch, Konrad Curze. Along the way, Talos and his squad encounter other traitorous legions and internal political conspiracies as they attempt to regain the glory of the past.

View original post 852 more words

Advertisements

Fanatics: How to Love Something Too Much

There are few relationships as complex as that between fans and the things they are passionate about. Being a fan can embolden, reassure, and inspire creators we love to reach new levels of success; it can show the best in humanity in creating a community of people who enjoy the same things. It does, however, also have a dark side (pun slightly intended). In recent years, I have seen sports fans burning jerseys they bought for hundreds of dollars because of a player’s opinions or actions that they disagree with. People make death threats because a referee made a call that was unpopular and they believe they were wronged.

And it isn’t just sports fans; geeks have been getting up in arms, calling people criminal for bastardizing their favorite characters or stories and review bombing movies in retaliation. My fellow nerds create internal cliques that espouse equality meanwhile looking down on those who disagree or like things that they don’t; this is where I have seen social media at its worst. People feel that their opinions and biases should shape the way others live. How self-important do you have to be to think that way?  The only way I can think of to address this is through two groups I belong to that have showcased this unhealthy behavior; let’s start with the geeks.

Featured Continue reading “Fanatics: How to Love Something Too Much”

The Art of Neil Gaiman – Review

Flashback Friday

Perpetually Past Due

The Art of Neil Gaiman by Hayley Campbell

Published in 2014

Pages: 320

Genre: Nonfiction, biography, coffee table book

“Neil Richard Gaiman was born on November 10, 1960, to David and Sheila Gaiman (néeGoldman) above a grocery store on White Hart Lane, Portchester, a small town in Hampshire on the southern coast of England.”

The Art of Neil Gaiman is a nonfiction book written by Hayley Campbell; I simply call it a nonfiction book because while it deals with fiction, it is in itself about Neil Gaiman and his career. However, I’m not sure if I should call it a biography since I honestly don’t remember the last biography I read and Campbell herself refers to it as a coffee book in her writing, so the task of classification is a difficult one.

What it definitely is, though, is a glimpse into the storied (intentional pun, I assure…

View original post 785 more words

Returning to Roots in Retrospect

Since I fall into the millennial generation, I use the verb “adulting” with a sly smile of irony whenever I do something like make a car payment or buy groceries. There was something else that made me feel like an adult this past weekend: I went to a housewarming party for a couple with whom I have been friends since high school. I am very good friends with the husband, and his wife and I get along well, but we have a bit of a past. Don’t worry, it wasn’t anything shady; I was just a jerk in high school.

1929443_22828273168_3508_n

Continue reading “Returning to Roots in Retrospect”