Open Eyes

We stand together with open eyes;
but that isn’t enough.
We need to continue this difficult conversation.
We are all bound by our
common humanity.

We no longer get to turn a blind eye.
African Americans in our country wake up to this
every day
and they don’t get the
luxury of looking away;
neither do we.

by Erik Shinker

If you would like to donate to help the recovery of Lake Street businesses who were victims of the rioting, please visit welovelakestreet.com

For more ways to support Racial Justice, this article has a large list that is a great resource.

My Fellow White People

My fellow white people, let’s perform a thought experiment, shall we?

Imagine: A video is released of an unarmed white man taken into custody for a non-violent crime who is lying on the ground, subdued by a black police officer who is placing his knee into the white man’s neck.

We hear the subdued, unarmed white man on the ground struggling for breath, begging through strained breath the black officer for minutes to take the pressure off before falling unconscious.

The white man loses his life; the black police officer only loses his job.

Would you not rage? Would you not stand in righteous defiance of a system that clearly failed to bring justice for someone who died in the custody of those who are supposed to protect us? Would you not cry out, make your voice heard, and exercise your right to assemble?

Of course you would; but that isn’t what happened.

George Floyd was an unarmed black man; Derek Chauvin was a white police officer. This was only the latest example of a problem inherent in our society that we are all too aware of; but while many white voices joined in solidarity to call for justice, many of us did not. Continue reading “My Fellow White People”

Double Standard

My words are just pointless noise,
meaningless when not directed
at the horrors that surround.

A blue, double standard
flies high in the face of
equality, empathy, and justice.
Protections make the prosecution of
the police more difficult;
they have acknowledged this, but
done nothing.

How can we not hold the enforcers of
our laws doubly accountable for breaking them?
Why is the burden of justification when force is applied
so much lower?
This is systemic, so how can we
trust the system when it is
built to protect the police and not
its citizens?

by Erik Shinker

If you would like to donate to help the recovery of Lake Street businesses who were victims of the rioting, please visit welovelakestreet.com

For more ways to support Racial Justice, this article has a large list that is a great resource.

Privilege

I have the option, to
bury my head, to
change the channel, to
avoid the distressing situation.
I can walk away and do nothing simply because of
my location, my socioeconomic status, my
skin color.

Yet another African American man
has died at the hands of the Police;
to deny this pattern is to be intentionally
blind and ignorant in the worst way.
People are angry, we are upset,
and rightfully so.

But there are those taking things too far;
destroying a community already beset by
grief and strife at the callous death of
George Floyd.
Empathy seems to have deserted us;
she has taken flight and withdrawn from our
undeserving presence.

I could choose to look at the
beauty in the world around me and
deny the evil in the system, but
that is a privilege I never asked for,
nor one I should abuse.

I have a platform,
a voice, and I am disturbed;
by the indifference I see, the
useless finger pointing and politicizing.
People’s lives are being destroyed, and
any one who thinks differently needs to take
a long, hard look at their perspective.

This isn’t happening in some far away place;
this is in my state, my country.
The world is watching us;
how will we show them that we can be better?
That we will be better? That when
change needs to be made, we
will roll up our sleeves and get to work.
This is a time of great unrest and difficulty,
and we need to build one another up, not
tear ourselves apart.

For those who are privileged like me, I beg you;
don’t turn away from what is happening.
Call to action; support the right to assemble and speak to truth;
demonstrate peacefully if you are moved.
We are in this together, and
we demand justice.

by Erik Shinker

If you would like to donate to help the recovery of Lake Street businesses who were victims of the rioting, please visit welovelakestreet.com

For more ways to support Racial Justice, this article has a large list that is a great resource.