The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat – Review

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat by Oliver Sacks

Published in 1985

Pages: 233

Genre: Nonfiction, psychology

“Neurology’s favourite word is ‘deficit’, denoting an impairment or incapacity of neurological function: loss of speech, loss of language, loss of memory, loss of vision, loss of dexterity, loss of identity and myriad other lacks and losses of specific functions (or faculties).”

The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat by Oliver Sacks is full of this type of language; those opposed to long and complicated medical terms that pertain to the brain should stop reading now (or continue reading; I’m not here to tell you how to live your life.). Compiling different cases throughout Sacks’ career as a neurologist, the book makes for a thought-provoking read. While the title sounds a bit ridiculous and possibly comedic, Sacks explores different types of neurological conditions with a careful and precise methodology that speaks to the universality of the human struggle. Continue reading “The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat – Review”