Conviction

The other side
must
be wrong;
if not, then
how could we
be right?

Such sure, strong support
must be testament to
our correctness.

Their passion is
hypocritical,
not noticing the
paradoxes and double standards
in their own beliefs.

Our opposition tries to
bend facts to their aims,
in a bastardization of
the truths we hold to be
self-evident.

Two sides to
the same, divisive coin
with minuscule differences.
But that is not what
they
would have us believe.

When did empathy,
humanity, and
compassion
become weakness?

Have we become so
self-centered to believe that
what we want is
all that matters?

There are few things more
volatile
than a person of
blind conviction with
blessed belief
in their cause.

by Erik Shinker

On the Subject of Freedom of Speech

Freedom of speech has long been a contentious issue throughout the history of not just the United States, but the world. How do we express ourselves without upsetting others? How do we go about hearing hurtful words directed at us and deal with them as responsible adults? What is okay to say, what isn’t, and who decides? The issue of freedom of speech has never fallen out of prominence in society, but it is especially prevalent today when people are afraid to speak their opinions. Continue reading “On the Subject of Freedom of Speech”

The Prince – Review

Il Principe (The Prince) by Niccolò Machiavelli

Published in 1532

H. Thomson translation (1910)

Pages: 71

Genre: Political science, nonfiction

“All the States and Governments by which men are or ever have been ruled, have been and are either Republics or Princedoms.”

The Prince is arguably one of the most well known works of political literature ever written which is saying something for a pamphlet written almost 500 years ago. Written by Niccolò Machiavelli as a guidebook on how to successfully rule, this book has transcended the troubles of its period and holds advice that continues to be relevant today. Continue reading “The Prince – Review”

The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt – Review

The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt by Edmund Morris

Published in 1979, revised and updated in 2001

Pages: 780

Genre: Nonfiction, biography

“On the late afternoon of 27 October 1858, a flurry of activity disturbed the genteel quietness of East Twentieth Street, New York City.”

Theodore Roosevelt is among the most famous of American presidents for good reason. Social reform, foreign policy expertise, and his famous mustache all come to mind when thinking about the 26th president of the United States. What The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt brings to the table is the tale of his not-so-humble beginnings and how he rose above sickness, the juggernaut of machine politics, and the concerns of naysayers to be one of the most influential men of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt covers the future president’s life beginning with his birth in 1858 and ending with his ascent to the Vice Presidency in 1901. In 780 pages, we see the asthmatic boy who would be president grow not only physically but as a person.

Theodore-Roosevelt Portrait.jpg
Theodore Roosevelt, Jr.

Continue reading “The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt – Review”