Futility

Gnawing maggots crunch and bite through
sinew and socket; their advance gained by
terminal termites whose mandibles made
short work of a mahogany coffin.
Tearing amid stagnant flesh and rot, their survival is
assured through our consumption;
we die so that they may live.

Is this the sacrifice preached from
countless pulpits? Is it a
maggot messiah who will rise on
the third day?
This is my flesh, my blood;
eat, drink and be filled.

Or are we losing our resolve at the
futility of trying to make sense of it all before
we, too, turn into
fuel for the feeding end?

by Erik Shinker

Virgin is Such a Dirty Word

I once had a friend who was a firm believer in astrology, so she was proud to inform me that I am a Virgo since I was born on the 22nd of September (which is also the fictional birthday of Frodo and Bilbo Baggins, so shout out to them); the symbol for Virgo is the maiden, or virgin, and I don’t think that she realized how accurate that is. Yes, I am a 26-year-old virgin (now the Hobbit reference makes sense, right?); I’m sure questions are running through your mind about how this could come about, and I hope to give some insight into the choices I have made throughout my life, some of which may surprise you. Don’t worry, the featured image is simply an allusion to the most famous of virgins; there won’t be any preaching in this post.
Continue reading “Virgin is Such a Dirty Word”

Blue Like Jazz – Review

Blue Like Jazz by Donald Miller

Published in 2003

Pages: 240

Genre: Nonfiction, semi-autobiographical, spirituality

“I once listened to an Indian on television say that God was in the wind and water, and I wondered at how beautiful that was because it meant you could swim in Him or have Him brush your face in a breeze.”

Though the subtitle of Blue Like Jazz, by Donald Miller, may seem like a bit of an oxymoron, “nonreligious thoughts on Christian theology” is precisely what the book covers. This is a book that does not seek to preach or convert, though it does play to a certain audience; people within or without the church who have reservations about their faith and are looking somewhere other than religious officials for advice fall into this category. Through his ever-present and well-written voice, Miller makes reading the book more like having a casual conversation with a friend than a lofty discussion of Christianity. Continue reading “Blue Like Jazz – Review”