Snuff – Review

Flashback Friday

Perpetually Past Due

Snuff by Terry Pratchett

Published in 2011

Pages: 470

Genre: Fantasy, satire

“The goblin experience of the world is the cult or perhaps religion of Unggue.”

Commander Samuel Vimes is being pushed out of the very occupation he lives for by the one thing a career criminal catcher fears the most: vacation. In Snuff, this catalyst sends Vimes and his family off to their country estate so he can take a much needed holiday. Well, much needed in the opinion of everyone except Sam Vimes. However, it isn’t long into the trip that trouble rears its ugly head in the shape of a mysterious murder. True to his nature, Vimes jumps at the chance to bring justice to the ne’er-do-wells among the knolls.

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Thud! – Review

Flashback Friday

Perpetually Past Due

Thud! by Terry Pratchett

Published in 2005

Pages: 382

Genre: Fantasy, satire

 “It started out as a perfect day.”

A dwarf has been murdered by a troll; while this isn’t necessarily something new in the world of Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series, in Thud!, it is the small stone that begins an investigation that avalanches and brings Commander Vimes and his faithful City Watch into danger and mystery. Following the classic plotting of a police procedural, the murder that begins Thud! delves deeper into the history of animosity between dwarfs and trolls that leads back to a famous battle known as Koom Valley, where each side says they were ambushed by the other and every battle between the two races is considered a continuation of the original…battle. In addition to this, Koom Valley was immortalized by a painter gone insane and many believe that there is a secret hidden…

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Maskerade – Review

Maskerade by Terry Pratchett

Published in 1995

Pages: 360

Genre: Fantasy, satire

“The wind howled.”

Maskerade, by Terry Pratchett, is the next book of the Discworld series to focus on the witches. Filled with references to Andrew Lloyd Weber’s musical, The Phantom of the Opera, Maskerade saunters its way through the drama inherent in the dramatic arts and takes no prisoners in its parody of hoity toity opera-goers from the days of yore. Entertaining in its cheekiness, the novel is a welcome satire of a genre that takes itself a little too seriously. Continue reading “Maskerade – Review”

Lords and Ladies – Review

Lords and Ladies by Terry Pratchett

Published in 1992

Pages: 375

Genre: Fantasy, satire

“Now read on . . .”

Mystery abounds in Lords and Ladies, another entry in the Discworld series by Terry Pratchett. Much like the first line, little is given in the way of direct explanation as to the strange and esoteric beings that give their name to the book’s title. A culmination of the events from previous witches stories, Lords and Ladies sees the return of Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg, and Magrat Garlick as they face a dastardly and ancient evil. Continue reading “Lords and Ladies – Review”

Witches Abroad – Review

Witches Abroad by Terry Pratchett

Published in 1991

Pages: 342

Genre: Fantasy, satire

“This is the Discworld, which travels through space on the back of four elephants which themselves stand on the shell of Great A’Tuin, the sky turtle.”

Stories have power in the fantasy realm of Terry Prachett’s Discworld series, and they take center stage in the novel Witches Abroad. Fairy godmothers, fairy tales, and happily-ever-afters come into his satirical scope in a novel that is as entertaining as it is endearing. Granny Weatherwax returns, alongside Nanny Ogg and the timid Magrat Garlick, for an adventure that dives not only into stories in general, but her own family history. Continue reading “Witches Abroad – Review”

Mort – Review

Mort by Terry Pratchett

Illustrations by Omar Rayyan

Published in 1987; 2016 Edition by The Folio Society

Pages: 222

Genre: Fantasy, satire

 

Disclaimer: This review will be different from the norm in that it is split into two parts: a standard, albeit shorter, book review and a specific review of this Folio Society edition. I am endorsing this product through my own volition and belief in its high quality.

 

Part I: The Story

“This is the bright candlelit room where the lifetimers are stored – shelf upon shelf of them, squat hourglasses, one for every living person, pouring their fine sand from the future into the past.”

The eponymous character of Mort, by Terry Pratchett, is an awkward, lanky, redheaded teen sent by his father to learn a trade because, well, that’s what parents do with children who can’t really contribute at home. When no one else picks him, Discworld’s anthropomorphic manifestation of Death appears and chooses Mort as his apprentice. Continue reading “Mort – Review”

Wyrd Sisters – Review

Wyrd Sisters by Terry Pratchett

Published in 1988

Pages: 360

Genre: Fantasy, satire, parody

“The wind howled.”

As befits a tale of witchcraft and regicide, Wyrd Sisters by Terry Pratchett begins on a dark and stormy night. A mysterious baby (well, the circumstances of its origin are mysterious…the baby itself is fairly normal…as far as babies go) is delivered to three witches: Magrat Garlic, Nanny Ogg, and Granny Weatherwax. Taking on Shakespeare and common misconceptions about witches, the novel is ripe with wit and satire to rival the other books in the Discworld series. Continue reading “Wyrd Sisters – Review”