Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch – Review

Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett

Published in 1990

Pages: 296

Genre: Fantasy, satire

“It was a nice day.”

Though this sentence isn’t necessarily what one would expect to begin a satirical story about the Antichrist kicking off the end of the world, Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett does its best to wring the funny out of the potentially terrifying. Good Omens (as I shall refer to it from here on) follows the attempts of hilarious and well-meaning characters as they seek to save the world from a holy war between Heaven and Hell. Continue reading “Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch – Review”

The Last Continent – Review

The Last Continent by Terry Pratchett

Published in 1998

Pages: 292

Genre: Fantasy, satire

“Against the stars a turtle passes, carrying four elephants on its shell.”

Terry Pratchett tends to zoom in on his stories by starting with a description of the Discworld; the beginning of The Last Continent is no exception. Finding Rincewind where we left him at the end of Interesting Times, the Librarian of Unseen University is sick and Rincewind is needed in order to treat the illness; the only problem: he is on the rain-less continent of XXXX which is surrounded by a magic hurricane and no one knows how to get there. Continue reading “The Last Continent – Review”

Interesting Times – Review

Interesting Times by Terry Pratchett

Published in 1994

Pages: 399

Genre: Fantasy, satire

“This is where the gods play games with the lives of men, on a board which is at one and the same time a simple playing area and the whole world.”

Such an enigmatic opening can only be the beginning to yet another Discworld novel. Interesting Times, by Terry Pratchett, picks up the thread of Rincewind’s life and sends him sprawling into adventure once again. Fraught with peril, politeness, and parody, Interesting Times continues the story of Rincewind; a man who seeks boredom in lieu of his naturally exciting life. Continue reading “Interesting Times – Review”

Eric – Review

Eric by Terry Pratchett

Published in 1990

Pages: 197

Genre: Fantasy, parody

“The bees of Death are big and black, they buzz low and somber, they keep their honey in combs of wax as white as altar candles.”

As brutal as those bees sound, they only serve to introduce the strange occurrences happening not only in Death’s realm but on the Discworld itself. Eric, by Terry Pratchett, takes the classic stories of Goethe’s Faust, Homer’s The Iliad, and Dante’s Divine Comedy and tells them through the lens of parody. Continue reading “Eric – Review”

Sourcery – Review

Sourcery by Terry Pratchett

Published in 1988

Pages: 326

Genre: Fantasy, satire

“There was a man and he had eight sons.”

While this is an impressive feat in itself for any man and his libido, it is a terrible omen in Terry Pratchett’s Sourcery. The eighth son of an eighth son of a wizard is known as a sourcerer (the intentional misspelling is due to the fact that a sourcerer is literally a “source” of powerful magic) and the one central to this story is named Coin. In order to escape the anthropomorphic manifestation of Death shortly after Coin’s birth, his father inters himself in a magical staff and proceeds to take over Unseen University through his son. Such magic hasn’t been seen on the disc since the mage wars of old and only one non-magical wizard can put a stop to it. Continue reading “Sourcery – Review”

The Light Fantastic – Review

The Light Fantastic by Terry Pratchett

Published in 1986

Pages: 241

Genre: Fantasy, satire

“The sun rose slowly, as if it wasn’t sure it was worth all the effort.”

Light on the Discworld crawls at its own pace through space and when the crimson gleam of a red star invades, panic swells among the populace. The Light Fantastic, the second novel in Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series, continues the adventures of Rincewind and Twoflower as they try to save the Disc and, since they live on it, their own lives. Cultists, wizards, headhunters and Twoflower’s enchanted Luggage all chase them as Rincewind flees from his prophesied involvement in saving the world. Continue reading “The Light Fantastic – Review”

The Color of Magic – Review

The Colour of Magic by Terry Pratchett

Published in 1983 (Also known as The Color of Magic in the U.S.)

Pages: 210

Genre: Fantasy, satire

“In a distant and second hand set of dimensions, in an astral plane that was never meant to fly, the curling star-mists waver and part . . .”

A disc-shaped world sits upon the back of four elephants astride a great turtle. This is the setting for the Discworld series by Terry Pratchett and is introduced in The Color of Magic. Twoflower, a tourist from the Agatean Empire, has come to the city of Ankh-Morpork with a sentient chest filled with gold. This fortuitous arrival sets in motion events that change the life of Rincewind, a failed wizard, and sends him on an adventure that isn’t exactly what he had in mind. Continue reading “The Color of Magic – Review”

Snuff – Review

Snuff by Terry Pratchett

Published in 2011

Pages: 470

Genre: Fantasy, satire

“The goblin experience of the world is the cult or perhaps religion of Unggue.”

Commander Samuel Vimes is being pushed out of the very occupation he lives for by the one thing a career criminal catcher fears the most: vacation. In Snuff, this catalyst sends Vimes and his family off to their country estate so he can take a much needed holiday. Well, much needed in the opinion of everyone except Sam Vimes. However, it isn’t long into the trip that trouble rears its ugly head in the shape of a mysterious murder. True to his nature, Vimes jumps at the chance to bring justice to the ne’er-do-wells among the knolls. Continue reading “Snuff – Review”

Thud! – Review

Thud! by Terry Pratchett

Published in 2005

Pages: 382

Genre: Fantasy, satire

 “It started out as a perfect day.”

A dwarf has been murdered by a troll; while this isn’t necessarily something new in the world of Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series, in Thud!, it is the small stone that begins an investigation that avalanches and brings Commander Vimes and his faithful City Watch into danger and mystery. Following the classic plotting of a police procedural, the murder that begins Thud! delves deeper into the history of animosity between dwarfs and trolls that leads back to a famous battle known as Koom Valley, where each side says they were ambushed by the other and every battle between the two races is considered a continuation of the original…battle. In addition to this, Koom Valley was immortalized by a painter gone insane and many believe that there is a secret hidden in the painting that will impact the worlds of dwarfs and trolls alike. It is up to Vimes and his rainbow coalition of the species of Discworld to discover the truth behind this ghastly piece of art. Continue reading “Thud! – Review”