The Mark of the Horse Lord – Review

The Mark of the Horse Lord by Rosemary Sutcliff

Illustrations by Felix Miall

Published in 1965; 2017 Edition by The Folio Society

Pages: 288

Genre: Historical fiction, children’s literature

 

Disclaimer: This review will be different from the norm in that it is split into two parts: a standard, albeit shorter, book review and a specific review of this Folio Society edition. I am endorsing this product through my own volition and belief in its high quality.

 

Part I: The Story

“In the long cavern of the changing-room, the light of the fat-oil lamps cast jumping shadows on the walls; skeleton shadows of the spear-stacked arms-racks, giant shadows of the men who crowded the benches or moved about still busy with their weapons and gear; here and there the stallion shadow of a plume-crested helmet.”

The above sentence describes a scene that could most likely have been taken from a historical account of a gladiator’s life. The Mark of the Horse Lord, by Rosemary Sutcliff, follows one such gladiator from gaining his freedom to becoming a central figure in a conspiracy to reclaim a tribal throne in Northern Scotland. Filled with swordplay, interesting characters, and intricate descriptions that cause the reader to become immersed in this ancient world, The Mark of the Horse Lord is entertaining in its character driven storytelling. Continue reading “The Mark of the Horse Lord – Review”

On The Subject of The Folio Society

Disclaimer: I have not been contacted or paid to write this editorial about The Folio Society. I am endorsing this company through my own volition and belief in the high quality of its products.

Those of you who have been following my blog for some time will have noticed a trend of lovely books popping up every now and then, all of which were made by a company called The Folio Society. I love paperbacks as much as the next reader, but sometimes there are editions created not only to celebrate the work of art that is the story; these copies seek to elevate the book into a work of art itself through the craftsmanship and design put into them. The Folio Society creates just such books, but what is The Folio Society, and why do I feel so passionate about what it is they do?

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Continue reading “On The Subject of The Folio Society”

Dune – Review

Dune by Frank Herbert

Illustrations by Sam Weber

Published in 1965; 2015 Edition by The Folio Society – Fourth printing 2016

Pages: 576

Genre: Science fiction

 

Disclaimer: This review will be different from the norm in that it is split into two parts: a standard, albeit shorter, book review and a specific review of this Folio Society edition. I am endorsing this product through my own volition and belief in its high quality.

 

Part I: The Story

“In the week before their departure to Arrakis, when all the final scurrying about had reached a nearly unbearable frenzy, an old crone came to visit the mother of the boy, Paul.”

There are books in every genre that surpass their contemporaries and create a new threshold that transcends the general attitude toward genre stories; Dune, by Frank Herbert, is one such book. A heroic tale that carries elements of Greek tragedy, the hero’s journey, politics, philosophy, and a myriad of other topics, Dune is well-renowned for the impact it has had not only on science fiction, but literature as a whole. Following the fiery downfall and phoenix-like rise of Paul Atriedes and his family, Dune mixes together stories of survival, religious zealotry, and prescience to create a tale like no other. Continue reading “Dune – Review”

The Norse Myths – Review

The Norse Myths by Kevin Crossley-Holland

Wood engravings by Jane Lydbury

Published in 1980; 2016 5th Printing by The Folio Society

Pages: 336

Genre: Mythology

 

Disclaimer: This review will be different from the norm in that it is split into two parts: a standard, albeit shorter, book review and a specific review of this Folio Society edition. I am endorsing this product through my own volition and belief in its high quality.

 

Part I: The Story

“Burning ice, biting flame; that is how life began.”

Though such brutal conditions often factor in creation myths, the beginning of the world as told in The Norse Myths, by Kevin Crossley-Holland, reflects the temperament of both the people and land that shaped the stories. Comprised of over thirty Norse myths retold with vigor, the book collects the most famous and influential of the remaining myths that have survived the vigorous strain of time and its attempts to steal knowledge so easily forgotten. Continue reading “The Norse Myths – Review”

The Wars of the Roses – Review

The Wars of the Roses by Desmond Seward

Illustrations by Frances Button

Published in 1995; 2011 Edition by The Folio Society – Third printing 2013

Pages: 372

Genre: History, nonfiction, English history

 

Disclaimer: This review will be different from the norm in that it is split into two parts: a standard, albeit shorter, book review and a specific review of this Folio Society edition. I am endorsing this product through my own volition and belief in its high quality.

 

Part I: The Story

“During the last years of the fifteenth century, on a morning in late summer, a small man stood alone by himself in a meadow in the English Midlands.”

The Wars of the Roses, by Desmond Seward, tells the story of one of the most politically intriguing and ruthless stretches of time in the history of England. Brother fought brother and nobles were slandered in the pursuit of power and control of the nation. This book, reproduced by The Folio Society, dives into the gritty details of the conflict and creates a story by following the threads of five people who played integral parts during the decades of death and deliverance. Continue reading “The Wars of the Roses – Review”

American Gods – Review

American Gods by Neil Gaiman

Illustrations by Dave McKean

Published in 2001; 2017 Edition by The Folio Society

Pages: 537

Genre: Fantasy, mythology

 

Disclaimer: This review will be different from the norm in that it is split into two parts: a standard, albeit shorter, book review and a specific review of this Folio Society edition. I am endorsing this product through my own volition and belief in its high quality.

Part I: The Story

“Shadow had done three years in prison.”

American Gods has been in the spotlight quite a bit lately with the recent television adaptation on the Starz network. This review, however, covers the book written by Neil Gaiman, upon which the show is based. American Gods follows the life of ex-convict Shadow Moon after he is released from prison, learns his wife died in a car crash, and meets the mysterious Mr. Wednesday. What follows is a meandering road trip across not only the geography of America, but the cultures and beliefs that came across the sea in the hearts and minds of immigrants. Continue reading “American Gods – Review”