J. R. R. Tolkien: A Biography – Review

Perpetually Past Due

J. R. R. Tolkien: A Biography, by Humphrey Carpenter

Published in 1977

Pages: 287

Genre: Non-fiction, biography

“It is mid-morning on a spring day in 1967.”

So begins Humphrey Carpenter’s J. R. R. Tolkien: A Biography, a look at the man behind one of the most popular fantasy series ever written. What follows is an in-depth study of Tolkien’s life from his birth in South Africa to his death in his beloved English countryside. J. R. R. Tolkien: A Biography gives an extraordinary amount of context that explains not only the style in which Tolkien’s stories were written, but the genesis of a brilliant man and the beliefs that shaped him.

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The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001) – Review

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001)Poster.jpg

Directed by Peter Jackson

Written by Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, and Peter Jackson; based on the novel by J. R. R. Tolkien

Cast: Elijah Wood, Ian Holm, Ian McKellen, Sean Astin, Dominic Monaghan, Billy Boyd, Hugo Weaving, Viggo Mortensen, Sean Bean, Orlando Bloom, and Jon Rhys-Davies

Length: 2 hours and 58 minutes

Genre: Adventure, drama, fantasy

MPAA Rating: PG-13

Description from IMDB:
“A meek Hobbit from the Shire and eight companions set out on a journey to destroy the powerful One Ring and save Middle-earth from the Dark Lord Sauron.”

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On the Subject of Adaptations: Part 3 – Goldilocks

Peter Jackson’s film adaptations of The Lord of the Rings have been lauded as cinematic achievements. The task of putting a series to film that was long considered unable to be adapted  was daunting and if the first film failed, there was no hope for the following two. However, through a labor of love truly deserving of the cliché, Jackson’s The Fellowship of the Ring (2001) set the standard for film adaptations of epic fantasy.

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The Fellowship of the Ring

Continue reading “On the Subject of Adaptations: Part 3 – Goldilocks”