America’s Emerging Writers: An Anthology of Nonfiction

Some of you may remember back in August when I had my writing featured in Minnesota’s Emerging Writers: An Anthology of Nonfiction. I am happy to announce that my writing has also been selected as one of 40 essays from around the country to be published in America’s Emerging Writers: An Anthology of Nonfiction!

America’s Emerging Writers: An Anthology of Nonfiction is now available and can be purchased through this link.

Taken from the website’s description of the book:

“There is a troubling catch-22 that exists in the world of publishing: in order to be published – at least by any of the major houses – you must already have been published. Inevitably, this cycle leaves the aspiring writer with the pressing question of where to begin. This is why, in the winter of 2017, we started our Emerging Writers series – to showcase the work of talented writers and poets who may otherwise not have had the opportunity. Nearly two years later, those efforts have culminated in perhaps our most ambitious project to date. In America’s Emerging Writers: An Anthology of Nonfiction, 40 of our favorite up-and-coming writers from across the nation join together to share their words. Covering a wide array of genres and topics, these young talents will amaze you. Containing one essay per writer, this anthology is a compelling introduction to the great wordsmiths of tomorrow.”

My particular piece, “Why Does Everyone Look So Happy?”, concerns the misrepresentation of people’s lives through social media, and how we can attempt to circumvent it to find our own happiness. Thank you for reading, and please feel free to purchase the book to read my essay and others by my fellow writers.

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When You Are Engulfed in Flames – Review

When You Are Engulfed in Flames by David Sedaris

Published in 2008

Pages: 323

Genre: Creative nonfiction

“My friend Patsy was telling me a story.”

Stories are what elevate much of the human experience, and it is the mark of a masterful storyteller to help their listeners or readers forget their problems and escape into a different world; this is true not only in fiction, but creative nonfiction as well. When You Are Engulfed in Flames, by David Sedaris, is a collection of creative nonfiction essays that cover everything from coming out as a gay man in order to avoid an awkward hitchhiking situation to arguing the validity of different unknown artists with his parents as a child. The collected stories make for an entertaining read that gives the reader a look into a perspective different than their own. Continue reading “When You Are Engulfed in Flames – Review”

Norse Mythology – Review

Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman

Published in 2017

Pages: 293

Genre: Mythology, Norse mythology

“It’s as hard to have a favorite sequence of myths as it is to have a favorite style of cooking (some nights you might want Thai food, some nights sushi, other nights you crave the plain home cooking you grew up on).”

The above sentence is probably not what one would expect to introduce a collection of Norse myths. Those intimately familiar with Neil Gaiman’s work will not be surprised that he jumped at the chance to retell the myths he loves most from Norse Mythology. The aptly titled Norse Mythology is his love letter to the tales of the Vikings, which feature not only action and suspense, but love, lust, poetry, and shapeshifting tricksters. In an attempt to pay homage to the stories that so deeply affected him, Gaiman succeeds in creating an accessible book to guide a new generation of readers into the nine realms. Continue reading “Norse Mythology – Review”

The Mark of the Horse Lord – Review

The Mark of the Horse Lord by Rosemary Sutcliff

Illustrations by Felix Miall

Published in 1965; 2017 Edition by The Folio Society

Pages: 288

Genre: Historical fiction, children’s literature

 

Disclaimer: This review will be different from the norm in that it is split into two parts: a standard, albeit shorter, book review and a specific review of this Folio Society edition. I am endorsing this product through my own volition and belief in its high quality.

 

Part I: The Story

“In the long cavern of the changing-room, the light of the fat-oil lamps cast jumping shadows on the walls; skeleton shadows of the spear-stacked arms-racks, giant shadows of the men who crowded the benches or moved about still busy with their weapons and gear; here and there the stallion shadow of a plume-crested helmet.”

The above sentence describes a scene that could most likely have been taken from a historical account of a gladiator’s life. The Mark of the Horse Lord, by Rosemary Sutcliff, follows one such gladiator from gaining his freedom to becoming a central figure in a conspiracy to reclaim a tribal throne in Northern Scotland. Filled with swordplay, interesting characters, and intricate descriptions that cause the reader to become immersed in this ancient world, The Mark of the Horse Lord is entertaining in its character driven storytelling. Continue reading “The Mark of the Horse Lord – Review”

Dracula – Review

Dracula by Bram Stoker

Published in 1897; 2011 Barnes & Noble edition

Pages: 399

Genre: Horror, supernatural

3 May. Bistritz. – Left Munich at 8:35 P.M. on 1st May, arriving at Vienna early next morning; should have arrived at 6:46, but train was an hour late.”

One would not suspect such a beginning to the most famous vampire story in the world, but it is the nefarious tendency of the undead to sneak up on their victims that this introduction replicates. Dracula, by Bram Stoker, follows the conquest of London by a melodramatic lord of the undead. After purchasing an estate in England, Count Dracula travels by ship to begin his malicious intent, only to be challenged by friends of the very man who helped him with the financial transaction that put his plan in motion. Told through the correspondence of the brave souls who stand up against this dark malice, Dracula created the template for the vampiric menace and kick-started a golden age for tales about the creature of the night. Continue reading “Dracula – Review”

Charlotte’s Web – Review

Charlotte’s Web by E. B. White

Illustrations by Garth Williams

Published in 1952

Pages: 184

Genre: Children’s literature

“Where’s Papa going with that ax?”

Charlotte’s Web, by E. B. White, is a classic and well-loved children’s story. The tale follows Wilbur; the runt of the litter, he is beset by the possibility of death from birth, but is saved by the kindness of friends. A book for children containing such themes as friendship, loyalty, growing up, life, and death, it is no wonder that it has remained as popular all these years after its first publication. Continue reading “Charlotte’s Web – Review”

Peace – Review

Peace by Gene Wolfe

Published in 1975

Pages: 264

Genre: Fantasy, ghost story, supernatural

“The elm tree planted by Eleanor Bold, the judge’s daughter, fell last night.”

Though this sentence seems imbued with significance, it will ultimately become one lost among thousands in the course of reading Peace, by Gene Wolfe. The story follows the rambling memories of Denny Weer; his thoughts run from one into another as flashbacks and flash forwards meld together, creating a spiderweb of connections in his mind. Life, death, pain, love, loss, the permeability of human memory, and sorrow all get their due time in this twisting tale about a man’s life. Continue reading “Peace – Review”